JOIN US FOR THE OAKS 2014 HALLOWEEN WALK
ON OCTOBER 31st!

Oaks Halloween 2014

Friday, October 31st from 6:30 to 8:30 pm.

Ghosts, goblins, pirates, princesses and all are invited to begin the Halloween Walk at the intersection of Alto Oak and Hill Oak. A table of holiday treats and beverages marks the meeting spot. Trick or Treating will be better than ever and the walk ends at Spring Oak and Park Oak Drive.

Park Oak Drive will be closed to traffic from the intersection of Spring Oak Drive to the 5 corners from 6pm to 9pm. Should you need to drive in or out of your house during that time, we ask that you please park your car on Canyon Oak or Spring Oak temporarily and enjoy the Halloween festivities. The Homeowners Association apologizes for any inconvenience and sincerely hopes residents agree that this short closure will make the Halloween night safer and more fun for everyone. Thank you!

 

BE MINDFUL OF YOUR PETS: COYOTES ON THE INCREASE!

There has been an increase in coyote presence in the Oaks and throughout Los Angeles. This may be due to lack of water and the coyotes are coming into urban areas seeking food and water. Many coyote problems are caused by people feeding the coyotes, either intentionally or unintentionally so let's take a few simple measures to help protect our pets and children: 

  • DON'T FEED THE COYOTES! EVER.
  • MAKE SURE GARBAGE BINS ARE FULLY CLOSED
  • DON'T LEAVE FOOD OUTSIDE
  • CLEAR AWAY FRUIT THAT HAS FALLEN TO THE GROUND FROM TREES
  • DON'T LEAVE YOUR PETS OUTSIDE UNATTENDED
For more information on how to techniques to resolve coyote conflict,
please visit: http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/coyotes/tips
/techniques_to_resolve_coyote_conflicts.html
P-22 UPDATE - OUR MOUNTAIN LION, AFTER MORE THAN TWO YEARS IN GRIFFITH PARK

P22-GriffithPark-MountainLion

By Gerry Hans

Concerns about Griffith Park’s mountain lion (named P-22 by the National Park Service), were addressed at the recent Oaks Homeowners Annual Meeting in March. As many now know, P-22 has recently been sighted walking on residential streets including Hollyridge Drive and Hill Oak Drive without incident. P-22 has also crossed Barham and then returned back to the Park.

Fortunately, the National Park Service (NPS) has been studying the mountain lions of the Santa Monica Mountain Range for twelve years and monitoring P-22 closely since he came to Griffith Park. He sports a collar which transmits GPS information six to eight times per day, mostly during the night when he is most active. During daylight hours P-22 mostly uses dense park habitat to rest.

NPS reports, “P-22 is by far the most urban mountain lion ever studied in and around the Santa Monica Mountains.” Scientists speculate that P-22, a five to six year-old male, is feeling the urge to find a mate and perhaps to find a larger territory to call home. Whereas Griffith Park is approximately eight square miles, male mountain lion territories typically are as large as two hundred square miles.

According to NPS, P-22 continues to spend a great deal of time in the most undisturbed and remote areas of the park and consumes his natural prey, mule deer. P-22’s behavior fits the pattern of other mountain lions studied: testing boundaries in urban areas and then returning to more natural habitat. These lions are shy and elusive animals.

At the Annual Meeting, Park Ranger Adam Dedeaux told us that a remote park video camera recently recorded a lone park hiker and then, twenty-nine seconds later, P-22. This illustrates that our mountain lion has had every opportunity to attack people and has chosen not to do so. P-22 is focused on deer for his meals. Adult mountain lions typically consume one per week, burying the kill and coming back to eat daily.

Various scientific surveys began in Griffith Park in early 2007 and the Oaks Homeowners Association has supported these efforts along with quite a few other organizations and individuals. In recent years, much of the funding for such surveys comes through Friends of Griffith Park. Because of the “Wildlife Connectivity Study,” P-22 was likely discovered (February 2012) soon after he entered the Griffith Park area. Partners in the second year of this work include NPS and United States Geological Survey (USGS). Currently there are about 30 cameras in Griffith Park.

Residents and park users are urged to exercise extra caution at dawn, dusk and evening. An excellent resource is California Department of Fish and Wildilfe's "Living in mountain lion country" website dfg.ca.gov/keepmewild/lion.html.

In an emergency, call 911. If you see P-22, call the Park Rangers at (323) 644-6661.

For further information contact Kate Kuykendall, Public Affairs Officer, National Park Service at 805-370-2343.

Basic tips include:

• Do not hike, bike, or jog alone.

• Avoid hiking or jogging when mountain lions are most active—dawn, dusk, and at night.

• Keep a close watch on small children.

• Protect your pets at night

• If you encounter a mountain lion, do not run; instead, face the animal, make noise and try to look bigger by waving your arms; throw rocks or other objects. Pick up small children.

 

Previous front page stories are available in the News Archive.